#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 12

Day 12 – Most Expensive Book:

I’m back again today with another Toni Morrison.  Beloved and Song of Solomon are my most expensive
books.  They are both from the Everyman’s Library collection.  Beautifully made and they look great on myIMG_1411 shelves.  Now the thing that really stumped me is this.  When I first looked into getting these editions I was so thrilled and was plotting where I’d display them on my shelves.  Unfortunately, when I finally went to order them I realized that Everyman’s Library only had Beloved and Song of Solomon. I couldn’t believe it. I was so disappointed and spent the rest of the time trying to figure how they could justify only have 2 of Toni Morrison’s books in their collection.  Two years later and I till can’t figure it out.  But, don’t you just love the great picture of Morrison on the cover?  What expressive eyes!   What’s your most expensive book?

#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 11

Day 11 – Favorite Toni Morrison:

Today’s photo is from one of my favorite authors.  I adore this edition because I love the photo of Toni IMG_1405Morrison rocking her afro on the back. Regal!  I’ve had the pleasure of reading almost all of her work except Paradise and Love.  I hope to get to them both before her new novel is released in March, I believe.  The Bluest Eye is Morrison’s first novel and it so happens it is the first Morrison I read.  I read it for a Black Women Writers class in my third year of studying English Literature.  It opened my eyes to a whole different way of writing and telling a story.  I can still remember how blown away by it I was.  The writing style, the character the development, the story’s structure, etc.  All of that perfection rolled up into a mere 164 pages.  If you haven’t read it yet you really need to make the effort to read it before the end of the year.  It’s poignant, will break your heart, but mostly make you think profoundly.  What’s your favorite Morrison?

#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 10

Day 10 – a Black Book:

A black book is like saying the little black dress.  It’s a book that makes an impressive impact visually and IMG_1394for the content between its covers.  I chose Trumpet by Jackie Kay.  I haven’t read this one yet but I’m very familiar with Kay’s beautiful poetry and Red Dust Road and am sure it’s very good.  I have to thank Claire over at Word by Word for introducing her to me and Kesha from ke-sha Forsaken for gifting it to me.  I immediately thought of Trumpet for today’s challenge.  It’s a perfect fit.

“In the 1950s and 60s, Scottish jazz musician Joss Moody was celebrated for his sound:  everyone who heard it imagined they knew the man behind it.  But with the remarkable fact uncovered upon his death, it becomes clear that no one but his wife, Millie, knew him at all. A tapestry of brilliantly realized voices from Joss’s world reveals the startling and poignant story of Joss and Millie: how they built a love, a family, a life out of a complex, dazzling lie.” (back cover of Trumpet Pantheon edition)

What’s your black book of the day?

 

 

#ReadSouLit Photo Challenge – Day 9

Day 9 – Beautiful Edition:  

Well if you have followed you know how important today’s theme is to me.  Beautiful Edition!  Now I IMG_1389had a few ideas for this one but I decided to choose one of the books that I’m reading at the moment and that’s Jacinda Townsend’s Saint Monkey.  Couldn’t resist, it’s so beautiful.  It’s colorful, vibrant, attractive and the artwork is sensitive to the book’s subject.  I don’t know the name of the artist who painted the picture on the cover (wish I did), but the designer of the cover is Jaya Miceli, who has designed plenty of other beautiful covers.  I’m enjoying this novel so far and will be back with an in-depth review.  I’m currently on p. 50.  Name your beautiful edition(s).

#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 8

Day 8 – Should Be a Classic:

Standing in front of my books shelves looking through trying to find a story that should be a classic was extremely difficult.  I stopped and thought to myself.  How can I find a book that should be a classic without thinking of what exactly designates a classic.  Three words came to mind:  Timeless, Universal, and IMG_1384Truthful.  Timeless –  The story should be told so that no matter what period it is read in it doesn’t feel dated.  The novel is as if secured on ground breaking stuff.  It’s always loved and respected through time.  Universal – The novel should hold meaning and should contain emotion, information that all mankind can read, understand, and learn from.  Truthful – The novel should ring true.  It should teach us about a time period, a place, a condition, or even about a people’s plight.  According to Wikipedia, “A classic is a book accepted as being exemplary or noteworthy, for example through an imprimatur such as being listed in a list of great books, or through a reader’s own personal opinion. Although the term is often associated with the Western canon, it can be applied to works of literature from all traditions, such as the Chinese classics or the Indian Vedas.”  Yes you saw the words in the middle that are troublesome, at least they are for me, the Western canon.  I really feel we should do away with this idea of holding up the Western canon as the standard for literature because not only is it limiting but it’s inaccurate since it mostly contains white men, but that’s for another blog post.

Looking at my criteria of a classic, I can always find books that fall into one or two of these categories but all three is difficult.  In the end, I decided to go with Roots: The Saga of an American Family.  It’s the novel that has touched the most people men, women, black, white, many nationalities and over generations.  It continues to be one of the novels that people read to understand slavery.  Not to mention, it did when a special Pulitzer Prize in 1977, although no Pulitzer for fiction was officially awarded that year.  So, what novel today would you choose to be a classic?  What’s your definition of a classic?

#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 7

Day 7 – Last Novel You Read:

I received this novel as a gift just last week from the lovely Denise D. Cooper.  I couldn’t wait to read it.  Firstly it’s such a cute little book and beautifully published.  That’s something that is very important to me about my books.  I know that may sound shallow but at this point in publishing only beautifully edited IMG_1377books seem to get noticed.  That’s a fact and in some cases it doesn’t even matter if what’s between the covers is good or not.  I’ve noticed publishers often sheer lack of interest in making novels by African-American authors attractive.  They are often downright unappealing!  This has to change.  So I’m secretly militating for pleasing to the eye covers for African-American authors and will always point out when this is the case.

So, you’re probably wondering what the name of this book is.  It’s called Quiet Strength:  The Faith, the Hope, and the Heart of a woman Who Changed a Nation by Rosa Parks and Gregory J. Reed.  While reading this little book which details the thoughts, feelings, actions of Rosa Parks, I wondered if I would or could have been as strong she and others who sacrificed, boycotted, marched, and persevered for Civil Rights.  The hardship of fighting back was the first step to refusing inequality and making a significant change for African-Americans.  What people can do when they put the collectivity in motion!  This novella is separated into twelve sections and delves deep into the realities of living and trying to survive for African-Americans through segregation.  Each section begins with a quote from the Bible that describes the meaning of the section, with a picture of Rosa Parks during another important part of her life.  It also puts rest to a lot of the supposed truths around what Rosa Parks was thinking and how she felt.  This is a book worth picking up.

“I knew that I could have been lynched, manhandled, or beaten when the police came.  I chose not to move.  When I made that decision, I knew that I had the strength of my ancestors with me.  There were other people on the bus whom I knew.  But when I was arrested, not one of them came to my defense.  I felt very much alone.  One man who knew me did not even go by my house to tell my husband I had been arrested.  Everyone just went on their way.  In jail I felt even more alone.  For a moment, as I sat in that little room with bars, before I was moved to a cell with two other women, I felt that I had been deserted.  But I did not cry.  I said a silent prayer and waited.” (Quiet Strength:  The Faith, the Hope, and the Heart of a Woman who Changed a Nation, Chapter Defiance, p. 24)

 

 

 

#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 5

Day 5 – A historical fiction:

Historical fiction is a genre I usually enjoy reading so I thought it would be easy to choose something from my shelves.  Well it really took time.  In the end, I decided on Wench by Dolen Perkins-Valdez.  This controversial novel definitely got people talking.  I remember reading some rich blog posts about it and those were what convinced me to read it.

Perkins-Vladez has painted a story that focuses quite closely on slavery in a way that hasn’t been explored IMG_1345in literary fiction before. This is mainly because of the taboo nature of the novel. She was inspired to write this book after reading the biography of W.E.B. Dubois where he mentioned slave masters taking their slave mistresses to a resort in Ohio. So, Tawawa House really existed. Although she could never find any documented specific stories about this place, she began to imagine what it would be like to be one of those slave mistresses. It’s a known fact that these unusual arrangements were existent and widespread among slave owners, but the resort adds a new facet, which allowed her to explore and focus on the slave mistresses.

“Six slaves sat in a triangle, three women, three men, the men half nestled in the sticky heat of thighs, straining their heads away from the pain of the tightly woven ropes. The six chatted softly among themselves, about the Ohio weather, about how they didn’t mind it because they all felt they were better suited to this climate.  They were guarded in their speech, as if the long stretch between them and the resort property were just a Juba dance away.” (opening paragraph of Wench, p. 3)

#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 4

Day 4 – Poignant (Auto) Biography:

Today the photo challenge is focussing on life.  Those stories that leave us feeling moved and make us thinkIMG_1338 about the difficulties of living it.  I thought of so many that I’m sure you’ve already heard of, so for the sake of
introducing something new that might spark your interest in African-American memoirs, I’m recommending Buck: A memoir by MK Asante.  He writes his story with a lot of passion and lyricism. It’s like reading music. If you’re interested in reading how someone who was spiralling downward manages to take control of his life through his discovery of art, music, and the desire to create, you should check this one out.  It is remarkable and talented with a hip-hop flair.

“MK Asante was born in Zimbabwe to American parents: his mother a dancer, his father a revered professor.  But things fell apart, and a decade later MK was in America, a teenager lost in a fog of drugs, sex, and violence on the streets of north Philadelphia.” (Dust jacket, Buck)