24 Books to Christmas – Day 6

baublesToday’s recommendation for 24 Books to Christmas is The Healing by Jonathan Odell.  I first became acquainted with this book on Denise’s YouTube channel ArtBooksLife. My curiosity was immediately peaked when I heard her talking about it. I couldn’t resist. I immediately purchased it but didn’t get around to reading it until 2016. I had the pleasure of buddy reading it with another Booktuber, Pretty Brown Eye Reader.  We had an excellent time discussing the story and marveled at the complexity and originality that is found in it.

The Healing is a slave narrative set in the back drop of Pre-Civil War South. It’s a story not at all like most we are used to reading in this genre.  From character development to story pacing to themes , Odell took the time to make sure this story was written in the most authentic way possible. In his Notes to the Reader Odell said, “Through writing The Healing and by stitching together my own family history, I have discovered the truth in the old saying “Facts can explain us, but only story will save us.”  Granada alias Gran Gran and Polly Shine are the best characters in the book.  You’ll surely find Polly Shine the healingintriguing and charismatic.  Both of these characters are unforgettable.

Overview:

“Seventy-five years later, Granada, now known as Gran Gran, is still living on the plantation and must revive the buried memories of her past in order to heal a young girl abandoned to her care. Together they learn the power of story to heal the body, the spirit and the soul.” (The Healing, cover flap)

I recommend The Healing to readers who appreciate slave narratives and to readers who don’t like slave narratives because they feel they are repetitive and never bring anything new to the table.  This would also make a great Christmas gift to those who might enjoy a book that they probably haven’t heard of, since this book was virtually not talked about enough when it came out.  Check out the video below of Jonathan Odell talking about race. It’s an excellent video to understand better Odell’s background and why he writes what he writes.

 

 

The Healing – Jonathan Odell

Publisher:  Nan A.Talese/Doubleday

Pages:  330

My rating: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

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24 Books to Christmas – Day 4

baubles24 Books to Christmas is really making me look back on my past reading. There are so many really great books that I’ve read in the recent past but also in the far away past.  I decided to go with The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks about Race for day 4.

The Fire This Time  was released in 2016.  It is an anthology that was edited by National Book Award Winner, Jesmyn Ward.  It’s a collection of 17 essays by some of the top black American writers of the moment. Discussing race these essays are all poignant and thought-provoking.  While its title is inspired by Baldwin’s, The Fire Next Time, Jesmyn Ward brought these essays together as a response to the ongoing atrocities happening to blacks and people of color in the United States.  You surely won’t forget them.

Sadly I feel like this collection was hardly pushed in the book influencer community at its release.  I wonder if that was because of the subject matter, or because it’s an anthology, or both.  Please comment below and let me know what you think the reason could be.

You’ll read powerful essays from Isabel Wilkerson, Kiese Laymon, Mitchell S. Jackson, Edwidge Danticat, Daniel José Older, and more.  The Fire This Time is accessible and not very long for those that find long essay collections a put off.  The collection is separated into 3 parts:  Legacy, Reckoning, and Jubilee, which represent some of “the darkest corners of American history” (The Fire This Time inside book flap)the fire this time.   I recommend this essay collection to readers looking for and excellent nonfiction read, readers who desire to learn more about living in the United States as a black person, and who are interested in reading nonfiction pieces from some of their favorite black authors.

The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks about Race, edited by Jesmyn Ward

Publisher:  Scribner

Pages:  215

My rating: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

If you’d like to pick up a copy of any of my recommendations please consider clicking my affiliate link for The Book Depository.  It would be much appreciated. It will help fund my incessant book buying, reading, and reviewing. Thank you!

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Incognegro Renaissance #1

Zane Pinchback, the light-skinned reporter from the black newspaper The New Holland Herald is back!  The graphic novel Incognegro introduced us to Zane and the daring way he goes about writing stories about the lynchings that were taking place all over the south during the 1920s.

Zane continues to use this approach in a new graphic novel called Incognegro Renaissance #1.  This will be the first in a series of graphic novels featuring Zane Pinchback and continues to take place in New York during the Harlem Renaissance, giving the name to the series.

The story begins of course with a murder as most mysteries do, but soon we see that Mat Johnson the author is setting central characters, setting, but most of all social complexities of this time period for black people.  We’re in New York and Johnson shows the race division was clearly traced of where black people were allowed to be even within the famous Cotton Club of the time located in the heart of Harlem.  Zane is a determined reporter and won’t stop until he uncovers the truth.

Incognegro Renaissance #1 is a pretty straight forward mystery, with beautiful black and white artwork from Warren Pleece who also drew for Incognegro.  The graphic novel is split into 5 major chapters.  The 2 major complaints I have with Incognegro Renaissance #1 is that it’s too short and secondly the pages aren’t numbered.  I was expecting the story to be a lot more developed like Incognegro, but I guess Mat Johnson is taking his time to build this series.  Despite those two complaints, it was a very quick and enjoyable read.  I’m looking forward to seeing how Zane passing for white helps him solve the murders of black people but also affects his relationships with his friends and colleagues in future volumes.

I recommend beginning with Incognegro because it will give you more background on the character of Zane Pinchback, as well as the other minor characters surrounding him.  You’ll then be able to get into the prequel, Incognegro Renaissance #1 with a better feel of the story.  I checked to see if the following graphic novels  Incognegro #2 and Incognegro #3 have been released.  I found that they have been but sadly only in Kindle format. I’ll have to wait until they come out in paper  format and I have no idea when that will be.  If and when I hear anything I’ll let you know.  If you hear anything please let me know. 🙂

Incognegro Renaissance #1, hardcover (Berger Books)

 

 

#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Day 22 Book and a Drink

Black No More has been on my TBR for quite a while. It’s on my list of #SundayShorts to read this year. Black No More is a Harlem Renaissance Classic that explores race in an unexpected way, that will spark much thought and deep conversation. « What would happen to the race problem in America if black people turned white? Would everybody be happy? These questions and more are answered hilariously in Black No More, George S. Schuyler’s satiric romp. »(back cover of Black No More) Of course there’s tea in this picture because that’s what I’m usually drinking when I’m reading. What do you usually drink when you’re reading?

Black No More – George S. Schuyler, paperback, 180 pages

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 27

Day 27 – Favorite Line/Paragraph: 

As you know Another Country was one of my favorite books that I read last year.  It was such a revelation to me – from the writing style to the complex characters and to all the societal themes that are still relevant today.IMG_1479  There were so many great lines from this book I had difficulty choosing.  I went with the scene on page 279 where Ida is trying tell Cass how it really is for black people.  Of course Cass thinks things are always exaggerated.  “Kept you here, and stunted you and starved you, and made you watch your mother and father and sister and lover and brother  and son and daughter die or go mad or go under, before your very eyes?  And not in a hurry, like from one day to the next, but, every day, every day, for years, for generations?  Shit.  They keep you here because you’re black, while they go around jerking themselves off with all that jazz about  the land of the free and the home of the brave.  And they want you to jerk yourself off with that same music, too, only, keep your distance.  Some days, honey, I wish I could turn myself  into one big fist and grind this miserable country to powder.  Some days, I don’t believe it has a right to exist.  Now, you’ve never felt like that, and Vivaldo’s never felt like that…..if he hadn’t been born black.” (Another Country, p. 279 Penguin Modern Classics Edition)  If you want to know more about what I thought click here.

What’s your favorite line/paragraph?