Dear Ancestors Poems & Reflections on the African Diaspora

Poetry is not something I pick up very much but in the past 4 years I’ve had the pleasure of reading some fantastic poetry collections.  This year has started with Dear Ancestors Poems & Reflections on the African Diaspora by CP Patrick, author of the compelling novel The Truth About Awiti.  There are poems in this collection that come from The Truth About Awiti.  I strongly recommend you check it out because it is quite the story with a dash of fantasy and deals with the African diaspora and the transAtlantic slave trade.

It’s a slim collection containing only 58 pages, a short poem on each page.  To the eye that would appear to be slither to discuss such a complex subject, but believe me it’s more than enough.  From the first poem I was thrown into the African diaspora, my emotions rising within.  I could put it down and when I did I had finished and reread it a second time.

The collection is structured in 4 parts – Home, Middle Passage/Second Home, Bondage, Freedom or Something Like It.  The poems in each section are perfectly understandable.  These poems are not obscure or difficult to understand.  They are written with nuance and a perspective that will touch you before you realize it.  These poems made me reflect but also made me remember how proud I am to be black.  I come from strong people.  People that have a history that doesn’t just start with slavery.

The fact that CP Patrick begins the collection with poems from the section Home that cherishes the beginnings of black people in Africa – free with their own lives and customs, good and bad, exhibits her desire to tell our entire story.

“if but for a moment

you were

stillborn

descending from the heavens

leaving the safety of my warm womb

you saw this sad world

and changed your mind”

clairvoyant stillborn

  • CP Patrick, Dear Ancestors Poems & Reflections on the African Diaspora, p. 28

If you’d like to pick up a copy of Dear Ancestors or any of my other recommendations please consider clicking my affiliate link for The Book Depository.  It would be much appreciated. It will help fund my incessant book buying, reading, and reviewing. Thank you!

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Day 25 First Letter of Your Name

It wasn’t easy finding a title that starts with the letter D in my collection of books.  In the end, I found two, Dust by Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor was one of them.  I decided to go with Daughters of the Stone by Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa, which is on my TBR for this year, since I’ll be focusing on reading what’s on my shelves. This was Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa’s debut novel published in 2009 and is apparently her only novel to date. Daughters of Stone follows five generations of Afro-Puerto Rican women through their physical and spiritual journey, starting in the 1880s.  Check out the video below where Llanos-Figueroa reads an except from her novel and talks about how and why she wrote it.

Daughters of Stone – Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa, hardcover, 323 pages

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Day 17 Must Read Mystery

I had to choose Walter Mosley’s Easy Rawlins series. It starts in 1948 Los Angeles. Easy Rawlins is the main character. He’s a nice fair man with good intentions. He’s also very seductive too. Even though, he can sometimes get himself in quite a lot of mess. You’ll be routing for Easy right from the beginning and until the end. Another important part of these books is the way Mosley writes about race relations between whites and black. This adds to the realism of the books. The setting always gives a particular unsettling feeling, with a mystery to crack. When the story gets really good, Mouse appears. Mouse is Easy’s crazy good friend. I’ve read the first 2 of this series – Devil in a Blue Dress and A Red Death. They were both excellent! I can’t wait to get to White Butterfly next! Have you got any mystery books or series to recommend? Drop them below.

The books in the picture above are the Washington Square Press Series edition.

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Day 14 Favorite Couple

Firstly, Some Sing, Some Cry is one of the best historical fiction/family sagas I’ve read in a long time. It was written by 2 sisters Ntozake Shange and Ifa Bayeza. It’s the perfect combination of family, history, music, struggle, and love. There are quite a few memorable characters in this book but the couple that moved me the most was Lizzie and Osceola. Now if you’ve read this novel you’ll know why. They gave me the feels.💖 You should definitely pick this one up if you haven’t read it and don’t get discouraged by its size. The story reads beautifully.

Some Sing, Some Cry – Ntozake Shange and Ifa Bayeza, hardcover, 560 pages (St. Martins Press)

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Day 13 “Food” for Thought

Had to go with this amazing book, 100 Amazing Facts About the Negro.  I’ve started reading since Saturday. 100 Amazing Facts About The Negro is the newly published (2017) nonfiction by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., which is based on the first edition from 1957 by Joel Augustus Rogers entitled « A Negro Believe It Or Not ». This book goes African diaspora and African-American History. You’ll find out Did Lincoln really free the slaves? Who were Africa’s first Ambassadors to Europe? or Why did free black people living in the South before the end of the Civil War stay there?

100 Amazing Facts About the Negro by Henry Louis Gates Jr. – hardcover, 496 pages (Pantheon Books)

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Day 11 A Debut Novel (Post 2015)

I haven’t read many debut novels by African-American authors in the past few years, but The Hate U Give was published in 2017 and surprisingly enough had me gripped. As you know, I don’t usually read YA novels but I loved everything about what I was hearing from this book on audio. The Hate U Give is a wonderful book for young people and adults.  Angie Thomas depicts the difficulty of police brutality and the meaning behind #blacklivesmatter for everyone to understand.  If you haven’t read it, definitely check it out or listen to this well-read audiobook.  Check out the video below where Angie Thomas is candid and intelligent about The Hate U Give, diverse books, black children reading, being a debut author, and so much more.

The Hate U Give – Angie Thomas, audiobook, 11 hours, 40 minutes

hardcover, 464 pages (Balzer + Bray)

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Day 10 Book Spine Poetry

Buffalo Dance The Journey of York – Frank X Walker

Some Love, Some Pain, Sometime J. California Cooper

He Never Came HomeRegina R. Robertson

Lost in the CityEdward P. Jones

Drinking Coffee ElsewhereZZ Packer

Nowhere is a PlaceBernice L. McFadden

A Kind of FreedomMargaret Wilkerson Sexton

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