2. EFL Series: Vocab Rehab

Poor vocabulary and lack of motivation to read the written word are some of the principal causes for slow progress in oral and written comprehension in English.  This is the case for most levels and all ages.  Teachers are constantly trying to devise new ways or to create beneficial lessons that enrich vocabulary, while captivating the attention of their learners.  Not an easy task you say, but I look at it as an ongoing challenge throughout the year.  There are no right or wrong ways to proceed.  The main goals are to not expect the learners to acquire more than ten words per lesson and principally to keep it fun and interesting.  This doesn’t mean they can’t see more than ten words.

Here is the lesson plan I used in my workshop that I do in my daughters’ school for a small group of French students in 5ème (that’s 7th grade for US).  Firstly, I explained that they would see a video which contained only music no speaking.  They seemed to be reassured by that.  Their job would be to observe carefully, not writing and not speaking.  I then allowed them to watch a second time.  After, I gave them mini white boards so that they could write anything that they could name in the video in English, absolutely anything i.e. tree, man, chair and so on  I also allowed them to write words in French if they didn’t know them in English.  So, finally we arrived at the third viewing of the video.  I periodically stopped the frame so that they would have time to visualize and to write the words they knew.

This video is simple and has quite a lot of things they should know in English at this level.  Of course, this is where the difficulty begins.  The learners and I suddenly realize all the words they don’t know, but as the teacher I try to keep them focused on what they do know for the moment.  After we’ve completely viewed the video for the third time we spend a few minutes talking about the video.  I try to illicit responses in English by asking some general questions:

Where is the young man?

What is he doing?

What is he going to eat for breakfast?

Where does he go?

Then we look at the words they wrote on their boards in English first.  I try to focus on what words seemed to come up on all the boards and which ones didn’t, especially easy words that they should know like postman, mail, pool, women…Then we look at the words they wrote in French.  I first ask aloud if anyone knows what the word is in English.  Surprisingly enough others know but didn’t put it on their board.  It’s great when the kids can help each other.  This gives them confidence and encourages team work.  As for the teacher,  it’s a chance to go over spelling, plurals, and to spell in English.  Spelling aloud in English is still a bit challenging for them at this level because they confuse the E and I and G and J.  They also forget how to say X, K, R and Y.

By the time this part of the lesson is finished I’ve already made a list of the words they don’t know on the board.  I then give them a worksheet with statements about the video.  They have to decide if the statements are true or false.  I verify they understand what true and false mean and then we continue the lesson.  I have each learner read a sentence and they say whether they think the statement is true or false.  The others can agree or disagree.  They must say why they disagree even if the language is simple, but it must be in English.  As we go along if they aren’t so sure of the answer, I open my laptop and put on the video so that they can verify the images for the correct answer.  They really do love this part and it allows them to reuse some of the vocabulary we went through before because it’s on the board.  Not to mention, they really do have very good memories.

At the end of the lesson the learners have to write the list of vocabulary words they didn’t know on paper.  Their homework is to choose ten of those words and write a sentence with each one.  When they come back for further workshops in the year I will have time to work on the other words on the list gradually.  So, there you have it!  Give it a try using any type of video.  If you can’t find one that is silent or that just has background music just turn the sound off.  Your learners will love it and so will you.  Look below for the link of the worksheet and video used for this lesson.

Breakfast Prepositions Video worksheet

6. The Slap

Well finally finished last night very late!  Frankly I didn’t think I would get through it.  The beginning had so much cursing and bad sex, I couldn’t believe it.  As the story advances, the principal themes start to become more clear.  It’s basically a story of friends and is set in Australia, specifically Melbourne.  The main characters are Hector, Anouk, Harry, Connie, Rosie, Manolis, Aisha, and Richie. The writer has given a section to each character.   You learn about the characters’ background and how they are related to the other characters mentioned.  Some of the themes are parenting, “being” Australian, alcoholism, domestic violence, aging, motherhood, family loyalty, homosexuality, drug abuse, marriage and fidelity.  I may have forgotten a few but it’s a very vast list, too vast.

Actually, I think there are too many themes running through the story.  I think it’s for this reason that things are often exaggerated.  It’s all in your face!

Tsiolkas tells the story from eight points of view where the characters question their desires, fears, and expectations.  In the beginning of the novel, there is a family barbecue which turns into a disaster when an adult slaps an indomitable three-year old. The slap and its consequences force the characters to evaluate their family life and the way they live.  The slap is the commencement of much retrospect which in turn brings out much jealousy, lying, and mistrust among the characters.  As things progress, the story becomes more interesting because the scope of the characters is better developed and more interesting to read towards the end.  I think my favorite sections are Aisha and Anouk.  The majority of the characters are far from likeable because they sometimes do such despicable things but the core and themes of the story are what keep you reading.

Christos Tsiolkas has written Loaded (was turned into a feature film called Head-On), The Jesus Man, and Dead EuropeThe Slap was longlisted for the Man Booker and was adapted for television on ABC 1.  Tsiolkas is also a screenwriter, essayist, and playwright.

I’d recommend reading The Slap if you’re interested in a bite of Australia.  The lifestyle is very much alive in the novel.  Although the  first 150 pages are probably the most difficult.  You will either hang on for dear life, which I did because I was reading it for my book club today or drop it like a hot potato. I finished it at 10pm on Friday.  I started counting how many times the f—-word was used.  When I counted up to 50 and I was only at the beginning it started to get on my nerves.  Someone mentioned that this was probably the way this class really speaks in Australia, but I’m not so sure.  Someone else today mentioned that a lot of the cursing was what the characters were thinking.  A lot of us found that the dialogue of these eight characters sure sounded alike, whether man, woman, old or young-not ver realistic.  I remember my Australian friends from Egypt and they are nothing like the men described in The Slap, nor do they speak the way they do in this book.  Then I thought could it be that they are not from the same class!  It’s really too bad there are no Australians in our book club.  We could have then got a better idea of what was realistic and what was stereotypic.  Despite all the bad things we said about The Slap, we did find a few redeeming aspects to the story.  I won’t get into details because I don’t want to write any spoilers.  We did have a good laugh and extensive discussion.  I’d give it about three and a half stars out of five, but I most definitely won’t be reading it again.

I don’t know much about Australian literature and the only other Australian I’ve read is Kathy Lette. I guess her writing would be considered Chick Lit, but it’s a funny and relaxing read.  Someone suggested that I read Peter Carey, so I’m going to check him out.  Hope to get one of his novels on my 50 read books list of 2012.  I’ll keep searching for more examples so that I can maybe finally come to some conclusion about Australian literature.  For the moment it’s a bit of a mystery…..

Check out the trailer for The Slap!  It seems to follow the book quite closely.  I can definitely see how this will keep audiences glued to the television in the evening.

The Slap – ABC 1 Trailer

5. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest

Amazing!! I absolutely loved everything about this trilogy and frankly I’m not always so thrilled about reading them because they are so lengthy and two and/or three are never as good as the first.  Not to mention, I think they are often long-winded and could be finished up a lot quicker.  I actually read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo in French.  I’d gone to a French bookstore and was looking for somethng completely different to read.  This was a long time before the books were released in the US.  I read it and liked it, but then reread it in English and liked it even more.  I quickly bought The Girl who Played with Fire and devoured it in 4 days.  My husband had started reading them and got all the way to The Girl who Kicked the Hornets’ Nest; so, I took a break and let him read it.  Unfortunately, I didn’t get a chance to finish the trilogy until yesterday, over a year later. It took me about 8 days to read not because it wasn’t good, but because my busy teaching schedule got the best of me last week. The Girl who Kicked the Hornets’ Nest is 743 pages, of pure excitement.  I thought my favorite book was going to be #2 and then #1 but in fact, it’s #2, #3, and then #1. I hated having to put down #3 to go and do other things.  I just wanted to know what wa going to happen next.

Fabulous!  I’m not an unconditional fan of detective novels.  I started to read this and was completely won over by the complexity of the story, the character analysis, the mood, and the underlying Scandinavian culture that runs as a constant denominator through the entire trilogy.  It’s cold, hard, and dark.  The last book wraps up all those loose ends but takes you through all the details and clues as if you were reading in reverse.  I tell you I was glued to the very last page.  It’s exciting and you want to know what’s going to happen to Lisbeth Salander and her enemies.  There are some surprising scenes but I won’t be doing any spoilers here so no worries.

It’s funny how these books seem to have won over millions of readers (about 20 million readers in 41 countries), but on the other hand there are  some readers who couldn’t get past page 100 of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.  All those in this case have said the same thing.  They thought it was too violent and couldn’t get into it.  They said it seemed to be a man’s book.  Funny, I thought it was a woman’s book. I found interesting the quotes, statistics, and information given between the chapters about women.

The main character is Lisbeth Salander.  She’s young, highly intelligent, anti-social, a fighter, a computer hacker, and fierce when she needs to be and this thriller trilogy is about her.  The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is just the beginning of a long saga of conspiracy, mystery, violence, computer hacking, politics, and of course plenty of intrigue. There is also a strong nazism theme that runs through this trilogy,  which was very lightly touched on in the Swedish film  from May 2009, directed by Niels Arden Oplev.

As it turns out The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, the American version directed by David Fincher starring Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara, opened in French theaters three weeks ago. I had the pleasure of seeing it in original version. NO!!!  I can’t bear watching English/American movies dubbed in French anymore.  It just goes against the grain. I feel as if though I’m missing out on an inside joke.  Indeed, it was an interesting adaptation of Millenium because Fincher has a way with filming dark and difficult situations.  It’s Hollywoodian, at its best and well worth seeing.  Rooney Mara’s performance was staggering and Daniel Craig made an excellent Blomkvist.  Physically, he’s what you would like to imagine for the character of Blomkvist when you see how many women he jumps into bed with.  I can’t wait to see what Fincher will do with the sequels.

  

Stieg Larsson was a genius because he revolutionized the detective novel with the Millenium trilogy, although I don’t think that was his intention.  Ultimately, I think he wanted to show the influence of extremism on Sweden as well as the complexities of govenment dealings and how it can effect society.  He unfortunately died of a heart attack in November of 2004 at the age of 50, when his trilogy was published posthumously.  He was a writer and journalist, who spent a lot of time researching and fighting against nazism and right-wing extremism.  As time went on, Larsson became an expert on right-wing extremism and gave lectures to Scotland Yard and wrote many articles on the subject.  He was the driving force behind an organization called Expo Foundation.  The Expo Foundation is a privately owned research foundation which aims to study, map, and fight anti-democratic, right-wing extremist and racist tendencies in Sweden and in Scandinavia. It was founded in 1995. I guess you could say Larsson was writing about what he had fought against for years.

It’s really a shame this genre of literature won’t have the possibility to continue with Stieg Larsson, but his commitment to this particular subject gave him the insight and knowledge to write such an important work.  Maybe someone else will take on this style of detective novel or even try to improve on it.  I wish them luck.  They’ve got their work cut out for them.  Only time will tell….

Check out the link below to watch the trailer for David Fincher’s version of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo!

For French speakers listen to the link below for more interesting information about Stieg Larsson.

France Inter – Stieg Larsson entre fiction et réalité

Black History Month

It’s Black History month again for some but everyday is Black history for me.  This has become a controversial subject in the past few years, whether it should be celebrated or not.  This is the month that we celebrate African-Americans’ achievements and their central role in United States history.  Black History month was actually developed from  Negro History Week, which was launched in 1926 by Dr. Carter G. Woodson.  Negro History Week gradually evolved into Black History month in 1976.

For all you avid readers out there check out any of these great black writers to get an insight into black issues.  This list includes a lot of my favorites however there are many more that I haven’t listed.  It may not be mainstream literature to most but a lot of this literature deals with current issues that touch all races and cultures. Enjoy reading….

Maya Angelou, Tina McElroy Ansa, James Baldwin, Claude Brown, Octavia Butler, Bebe Moore Campbell, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Eric Jerome Dickey, W.E.B. Du Bois, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Ralph Ellison, Ernest J. Gaines, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Nikki Giovanni, Alex Haley, Lorraine Hansberry, Lynn E. Harris, Chester Himes, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Jamaica Kincaid, Bernice L. McFadden, Louise Meriwether, Toni Morrison, Terrry McMillan, Walter Mosley, Jess Mowry, Gloria Naylor, Barbara Neely, Ishmael Reed, April Sinclair, Alice Walker, Margaret Walker, Dorothy West, Richard Wright, Malcom X….

Write in and tell me what you read and liked!

Here’s the main reason I love Black History month (all the interesting people I learn about):  I was reading a blog post a couple of days ago about inspirational black women, Phyllis Wheatley (1753-1784) the first published African-American poet was the center.  I ‘ve just learned about her and will be taking some time to find out more about her and to read some of her poetry. Check out his blog post on fleurdecurl.wordpress.com!

4. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Pouring over my shelves and piles of books, I found this little tale hidden between two big monster size books I haven’t read yet.  Actually I had totally forgotten about it.  I bought it a while back at a book sale in Paris for 1€.  I love a good book deal.  I enjoyed reading F. Scott Fitzgerald in high school and at university.  It’s funny this book was never proposed on any of my reading lists at university.  As a matter of fact, The Great Gatsby found its way on my book club list last year.  Everyone questioned what was so special about Fitzgerald’s style of writing.  I love the way he puts words together,especially in The Great Gatsby.  I didn’t think I would enjoy reading it a third time but I did immensely.  He gives images and ideas in his own way, but a clear way.

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is only 52 pages – a really quick read!  As I was reading I had the impression that this tiny book should have been much longer.  It seemed to be an idea he didn’t know how to develop because of its fantasy theme.  I thought the idea of a baby born old who progressively gets younger an interesting idea for a novel.  Unfortunately, I felt it was too short.  However, the basic plot is exclusively the story of Benjamin Button’s lifetime linked together with carefully chosen anecdotes.  This is not a typical plot line. So, don’t read it expecting something to happen or a climax.  Each anecdote deals with a specific idea about age and reflecting society’s current attitude toward age and aging.

Age is such an ongoing subject even today in the 21st century where we live to ripe old ages of 90 and above and where fifty and sixty somethings don’t necessarily look their ages. In The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Fitzgerald builds a fantastical and dreamlike world through the style and tone of his writing.  Each section seems to begin as if it’s a new story but in fact marks Benjamin becoming younger, a new experience each time.  In essence Benjamin’s life is not any easier in reverse.  He has the same difficulties as when you age – when you’re older people think you’re wise, admire you, and are even repulsed by you and when you’re younger you’re not taken seriously enough and people are often jealous if you’re middle-aged and  look younger.  Not to mention, all the while he’s becoming younger than all of his family members as the story unfolds.

I’m not so sure about recommending this book because it left me with gaps – I wanted more but it was too short to deliver.  I’m not sure how they made a two-hour movie out of this tale without adding some things that weren’t actually in the book.  I’m assuming that because I didn’t see the movie.  I guess reading it won’t take up too much of your time so why not give it a go.  You might enjoy it more than me.

1. EFL Series: What a dollar can do!

I have learners of all ages but this lesson came to me after surfing the net looking for things to put on one of my Pinterest boards.  I ran across a picture of a ring made from a dollar bill.  I then set out to find a clear and precise video explaining how to make this ring dollar bill ring.  I just knew that this would be an interesting successful lesson to motivate three students that I teach in a group.  Finally after a thorough search on You Tube I found someone explaining how to fold a dollar bill into a ring.  I’ll link the video below.

Firstly, I made a list of important words needed to follow the instructions to fold the dollar bill.  Keeping in mind these key words can be used to fold origami as well as be used to express other everyday ideas.  Since these students are 12 and 13 I tried to make the list of words short and sweet.  Here’s the list I used:  crease, fold, edge, tuck, lift up, corner, faint, layer, pop outward.  The last word pop outward is a little complicated but it was better to show them what it meant to avoid any comprehension problems.  I made a definition worksheet which contained these words and their meanings in English that they could keep for future use. You can also illicit other ways we use these words and maybe your learners will ask what they mean like mine.  One asked “What does you’re living on the edge mean?” You can explain what it means to be tucked in at night.  you can ask your learners if they have ever felt faint, etc.

After the explaining the key words, the learners watched the short You Tube video and then I gave them a dollar bill so that they could follow along the second time they watched the video.  Before starting the video, I explained to the students that thy were to watch the video and that they couldn’t ask me any questions until the task was completed.  They could help each other in English and ask me to backtrack the video as needed.  I paused the video at times to give the learners a chance to do the folding.  During this process I didn’t speak.  I didn’t want the learners to be distracted from the video.  Once finished they had a ring and a dollar bill as a souvenir of the class; really cool for them.  Evidently, you’re not going to give all your learners dollar bills to do this lesson.  What I suggest is to get some nice decorative paper ie. gift wrapping paper or just plain white paper.  Cut it to the size of a dollar bill, which is approximately 15,5cm x 6,5cm.  If you decide to do it with white paper you can get your learners to decorate the rings themselves.  In the end you get…

Lots of fun this lesson.  You can then carry on by dictating how to fold an origami bird, the crane.  Give out some white paper cut into squares or use origami paper which can be bought in a local craft shop.  Don’t worry it’s affordable. The crane is one of the easiest animals to fold and then you can see how much your learners have understood of the different commands.  You can even make it into a competition of who folded the neatest bird.  At the end of the lesson you give the learners the definition worksheet and a copy of explanations on how to fold the

crane, which you can see below.  Voilà, you have an easy, fun, original, and certainly entertaining English  lesson.  For a longer lesson you can replay the video and go over what was said and explain any vocabulary or expressions not understood.  Give it a try and have fun teaching while your learners are having fun learning!

How to make an origami dollar bill ring

3. Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet

As I was reading this novel I realized how little I had learned about Japanese Americans being confined in “internment” camps.  I do remember that it was mentioned but certainly not dwelled upon.

This is a love story between Henry Lee, Chinese American and Keiko Okabe, Japanese American set in 1942, with a shift between the past and the present 80s.  The Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941 and anti-Japanese sentiment was on the rise.  So much so that Henry was told to wear a button on his jacket “I am Chinese”.  The back drop of the story is Seattle with its Japanese (Nihonmachi) and Chinese neighborhoods.  All of this with a sprinkling of jazz music to tie it all together.

Reading along you will discover the hatred of Americans towards Asians in general, but specifically towards Japanese no matter how integrated they were in the community because of the Japanese’s participation in World War II.  The wounds of the war trickled down to the depths of the average American – refusing to serve them in shops, confining them to their neighborhood with strict curfews, firing them from their jobs,etc.  All this until they were finally rounded up and bused off to “relocation centers”.  Beyond these hostilities an unlikely friendship was made between young Henry and Sheldon, a black man who is twice Henry’s age and who plays the saxophone on street corners for pocket change.  This life long friendship was a constant for Henry and was a sort of second family for Henry. Sheldon was full of wise and helpful advice for Henry.

I won’t go into anymore details because it’s tempting and I feel as if I’ve told you too much already.  It’s just a beautifully written story that you must experience for yourself.  It encompasses many various themes of literature like immigrating, loyalty, honor, the roles of mothers and wives, but particularly the father-son relationship. Moreover, Jamie Ford’s remarkable debut novel, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, has had much recognition since it was published in 2009. It’s been on many selections:  IndieBound NEXT List,  Borders Original Voices, Barnes & Noble Book Club, Pennie’s Pick at Costco, a Target Bookmarked Club Pick, and a National Bestseller, and named the #1 Book Club Pick for Fall 2009/Winter 2010 by the American Booksellers Association.

“Sentimental, heartfelt….the exploration of Henry’s changing relationship with his family and with Keiko will keep most readers turning pages…A timely debut that not only reminds readers of a shameful episode in American history, but cautions us to examine the present and take heed we don’t repeat those injustices.”

— Kirkus Reviews

“Jamie Ford’s first novel explores the age-old conflicts between father and son, the beauty and sadness of what happened to Japanese Americans in the Seattle area during World War II, and the depths and longing of deep-heart love. An impressive, bitter, and sweet debut.”

Lisa See, bestselling author of Snow Flower and the Secret Fan

I didn’t see the fab critics when I decided to read this book, but hope the ones above and mine will win you over..  This was one of my book club’s picks for 2011-2012.  I’m very delighted that I had a chance to read this book.  It left me feeling like the title “bitter and sweet” and taught me some more about my American history.  My book club met up yesterday to discuss the book and for once we were a full house and all in agreement with a lot about the book.  That was an amazing first too. I can tell you with all the different ages, backgrounds, jobs, and likes in general in the room a big thumbs up from everyone tells you that you will love it too!  Look out for Jamie Ford’s second novel in 2013.

Check out the link below for some pictures about World War II on the internment of Japanese Americans.

World War II: internment of Japanese Americans

2. The Science of Black Hair

Two years today I did a leap and big chopped* after transitioning* for four months to become natural.  I hadn’t seen my natural hair for more than 30 years.  I didn’t even know what my natural hair texture would be like.  The only thing I had to go on were many pictures of me with my long plaits hanging down on both sides, with hair ribbons and bows.  I’d completely forgotten everything about its texture and its length, but I did remember the discomfort of having my hair done, tender headed.  At the end of the summer in August 2009,  I was desperate for my scalp to stop itching after the last relaxer* that I had gotten on holiday in the States.  So I decided to only shampoo, condition, moisturize and air dry my hair during the transition period since my hair was very short anyway.  That went well until January 7, 2010 when I got fed up with scraggly ends which I was afraid would break, not to mention I was starting to look like a wet cat, and cut off all the relaxed ends.  I was left with 3cm of hair all over my head.  Somehow, I felt liberated and a lot of cold air on my scalp when I went out in the cold Normandy winter.  I regretted nothing.

Recently, natural hair has become more popular as an alternative to relaxing, weaves, and wigs. Although, black women who decide to big chop without having done research find their hair journey to be a trying and daunting task.  So, if there are any wannabee naturals, natural newbies, transitioners, loc wearers, or even relaxed hair wearers reading this post, I suggest you save yourselves the grief, the product junkie-ism, and wondering how to care for your hair.  Go out and get The Science of Black Hair!

This book is what we’ve all been waiting for.  It details everything from explanations on how hair grows, the structure of black hair, product analysis, regimens, children’s hair care, caring for relaxed hair, etc.  Everything is touched on in this book.  I read it in one week but my copy is full of highlights and dog-eared pages.  It’s the book you will refer to throughout your hair journey, whether you’re at the beginning or reached your hair goal.  There has been no other book like this written.

Basically, the book is about 250 pages and is separated into five major units:  1. The Science of Black Hair, 2.Healthy Hair Management, 3.  Working with Chemicals in a Healthy Hair Care Regiment, 4 Children’s Hair Care, and 5. The Hair-Total Body Connection.”  Under each of these units, there are various chapters that deal with the specificities of the unit, containing micrographic pictures (really cool!), graphs and information boxes.  There is a full in-depth index, a glossary, and product ingredient glossary in the back.  If you’re interested in doing more research on hair you can refer to Davis-Sivasthy’s references.  There you will find the references she used to write this informative book.  I also recommend buying the hardcover because it’s the kind of book you will refer to throughout your hair journey.

Today is my 2 year “nappy” anniversary and I’m proud to have made it from 3cm of hair length to the 21cm I have today.  I didn’t read this book until last week but it has confirmed the things I had to find out the long, hard way and enlightened me with new information, like the importance of a good balance between moisture and protein.  This is essential to healthy afro hair growth.  It’s also the most difficult to pinpoint because all afro hair is very different.  I feel as though after reading The Science of Black Hair that I’m getting even closer to perfecting this important combination.  Davis-Sivasothy has also added some Q and A street interviews, which add a certain authenticity to the book.  All in all an excellent, easy read and all for only $32.95 in hardback and $24,95 in paperback on Amazon.com

Look how far I’ve come.  After reading The Science of Black Hair I know I can go even further…….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For those of you looking for supplementary information about natural hair there  are many hair care forums and You Tube channels that can help you along your hair journey.  My favorite hair care forum is NaturalSunshine.com.  Some of my favorite You Tube hair channels are MsRosieVelt, tastiredbone, africanexport, louloumatou, Naptural85, ahsiek1118, TheNaprika, 160Days2Lose2, tonidaley80, whoissugar, beuniquehaircare, FusionofCultures, and BlackIzBeautyful to name a few, but there are so many more……Once you start watching you won’t want to stop!

*Big Chop – BC: to cut off all relaxed ends of the hair leaving a very short afro known as TWA(teeny weeny afro)

*transition – growing out a relaxer and just trimming the ends regularly until all the relaxer is gone.

*relaxer – chemical processing the hair using a lye product, sodium hydroxide, which is put on the roots of the hair about every 6-8 weeks to keep the appearance of straight hair.

Enriching EFL Teaching in 2012

It’s 2012 and we’re all back to teaching full-time.  This is the chance for us all to do our teaching in an even more efficient way.  Some expert teachers with many years behind them would say try teaching differently.  For example, if you teach with a book teach without one.  If you always make lesson plans try not making them or vice versa. I’m going to suggest one particular thing which has helped me tremendously in the past 4 years.  I heard someone suggest this in a conference a while back but I never could seem to make the time.  What is it you ask?  It’s simply learning to do something that you don’t know how to do.  It could be learning a foreign language, learning to play an instrument, taking drawing or painting lessons, learning to cook or to make pottery.

Concert Emile Jolie

It’s amazing how much more you learn about this new activity but as well about yourself and your students. The learning process becomes even more clear.  Four years ago, I picked up the violin.  I like to say it like that because it makes it sound so easy.  Actually, it’s the instrument I desired to play the most when I was a child but wasn’t allowed to.  We had a piano.  So, at the age of 41, I decided to enroll in the local Conservatoire here in   my city where I study music side by side with young children and adolescents between the ages of 10 and 17.  This has been the most enriching experience for my personal development and especially for my teaching.  It’s made me see things from the learners point of view.  I can equate better with the moments of low enthusiasm, confusion, and the ups and downs that learners experience quite often in EFL or any other learning experience as the level becomes more challenging.  Self motivation, consistency, and desire are needed by both students and teachers to carry out this endeavor.  One is not dominant over the other because it’s a joint effort for the common goal of acquisition.  It can only work out well if both put forth an honest effort.  Of course, this doesn’t mean you can’t have a little fun in the process.

At times, the learner may need a big push up the hill or a bit of a carrot to get from one level to another. Notice I said a push not pulling.  Pulling would show an all out refusal to go any further.  This is just an idea for those teachers out there who feel as if they are always doing the same thing and feel as if they are not reaching their students the way they would like to.  Taking risks in teaching and trying new things can always teach you something new. Try to get out of your comfort zone.  This is what teachers usually say to their learners.  Are you ready to?  So get out there and learn to do something new.  Doesn’t matter what it is!  You might be surprised by the amount of new lessons you’ll come up with and how innovative they’ll be. Good luck with it!

Concert Emilie Jolie