Incognegro Renaissance #1

Zane Pinchback, the light-skinned reporter from the black newspaper The New Holland Herald is back!  The graphic novel Incognegro introduced us to Zane and the daring way he goes about writing stories about the lynchings that were taking place all over the south during the 1920s.

Zane continues to use this approach in a new graphic novel called Incognegro Renaissance #1.  This will be the first in a series of graphic novels featuring Zane Pinchback and continues to take place in New York during the Harlem Renaissance, giving the name to the series.

The story begins of course with a murder as most mysteries do, but soon we see that Mat Johnson the author is setting central characters, setting, but most of all social complexities of this time period for black people.  We’re in New York and Johnson shows the race division was clearly traced of where black people were allowed to be even within the famous Cotton Club of the time located in the heart of Harlem.  Zane is a determined reporter and won’t stop until he uncovers the truth.

Incognegro Renaissance #1 is a pretty straight forward mystery, with beautiful black and white artwork from Warren Pleece who also drew for Incognegro.  The graphic novel is split into 5 major chapters.  The 2 major complaints I have with Incognegro Renaissance #1 is that it’s too short and secondly the pages aren’t numbered.  I was expecting the story to be a lot more developed like Incognegro, but I guess Mat Johnson is taking his time to build this series.  Despite those two complaints, it was a very quick and enjoyable read.  I’m looking forward to seeing how Zane passing for white helps him solve the murders of black people but also affects his relationships with his friends and colleagues in future volumes.

I recommend beginning with Incognegro because it will give you more background on the character of Zane Pinchback, as well as the other minor characters surrounding him.  You’ll then be able to get into the prequel, Incognegro Renaissance #1 with a better feel of the story.  I checked to see if the following graphic novels  Incognegro #2 and Incognegro #3 have been released.  I found that they have been but sadly only in Kindle format. I’ll have to wait until they come out in paper  format and I have no idea when that will be.  If and when I hear anything I’ll let you know.  If you hear anything please let me know. 🙂

Incognegro Renaissance #1, hardcover (Berger Books)

 

 

Black History Month UK

October was designated as Black History Month in the UK by Akyaaba Addai Sebo in 1987. This was as a result to the riots of the 1980s in the UK when black Britons fought for tolerance and acceptance and their fight against racism and marginalization headlined. Black History Month was chosen to be in the month of October because it is the month when African leaders and chiefs get together to settle their differences. It also corresponds to the beginning of the school year and there was hope that it would instill pride in black children.

Since I host a month of videos, Instagram photo challenges, a readalong, and blog posts for Black History Month in February for the US, I felt like I needed to do something this year for Black History Month UK and I will continue to do things for October. I’m terribly disappointed that it is hardly mentioned in the book communities online, especially since there are many other different book activities hosted this month. So, I decided to spearhead a readalong of 26a by Diana Evans over on Goodreads.

I believe when readers are asked who is their favorite black British writer they either have a tendance to say Zadie Smith or they have no idea. I find that a little sad because there are a plethora of black British writers out there but I don’t think they are getting as much recognition and love as they should. So I decided to contribute these two extensive lists below of black British Women and Men Writers that you may not have even heard of.

Once during one of my Instalives someone asked me, «Who is your favorite British author? » I was taken aback because the only name that came to mind was Zadie Smith. It was in that moment that I realized I was lacking in reading Black British authors. There were other names I could have said that I’d read, but for some reason they weren’t coming to mind. That goes to show how important publicity is and why it’s important to not only read black writers but to talk about them and to gush about your favorites. Why is it we can name white men and women British writers’ names without hesitation? Their names are foremost in our heads because they are literally all over the net ALL THE TIME from Goodreads to YouTube to Instagram to Litsy and so on….

In order to encourage you to discover some black British writers check out my list below. I’ll highlight the authors and the titles I’ve read. I’m sure this is another literary journey I’ll attempt to go on eventually because the lists are rich. At the moment, I’m enjoying discovering literature from the Caribbean, which will overlap with these two lists. Concerning my Caribbean reading journey, the backlist has been where I’m finding the gems. The Backlist is where it’s at people. You’re chasing the new titles and missing out on the tried and true. Remember there will always be new titles coming out but the oldies are classics which stand the test of time.

Black British Women Writiers

Mojisola ADEBAYO

Helen OYEYEMI

Patience AGBABI

Joan ANIM-ADDO

Similar BEDFORD

Malorie BLACKMAN – Noughts and Crosses

Zena EDWARDS

Buchi EMECHETA

Diana EVANS – 26a

Bernadine EVARISTO

Laura FISH

Aminatta FORNAThe Memory of Love

Beryl GILROY

Jackie KAYRed Dust Road An Autobiographical Journey

Dorothy Koomson

Andrea LEVY

Sheree MACK

Dreda Say MITCHELL

Nadifa MOHAMED

Grace NICHOLS

Sharon DODUA

Winsome PINNOCK

Lou PRENDERGAST

Mary PRINCE

Joan RILEY

Mary SEACOLE

Khadijah (George) SESAY

Dorothea SMARTT

Zadie SMITHNW/On Beauty/White Teeth/Swing Time (curently reading Feel Free)

Adela SOLANKE

Su ANDI

Debbie TUCKER GREEN

Yrsa DALEY-WARDbone

Precious WILLIMAS

Oona KING

Irenosen OKOJIE

Hannah POOL

Yvette EDWARDS

Black British Men Writers:

Alex WHEATLE

Benjamin ZEPHANIAH

Caryl PHILLIPSCrossing the River

Courttia Newland The Gospel According to Cane

Diran ADEBAYO

Mike GAYLE

Paul GILROY

Ben OKRI

E. R. BRAITHWAITE

Gary YOUNGE

Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows – Balli Kaur Jaswal

Today my book club met to discuss our second book of the 2018-2019 school year, Erotic Stories For Punjabi Widows. The discussion was short but rich. There was an overall consensus that Jaswal did an excellent job depicting the complexity of the Indian community in Southall. Nikki the main character of the story is a young modern Indian origin woman looking for her correct path in life. She refuses her father’s expectations of her being lawyer halfway through the degree and winds up “teaching” English to Punjabi widows in the community hall in Southall.

In spite of the seemingly well-plotted out novel, Jaswal doesn’t deliver on making the characters meaningful. We can’t get close enough to them to like them. The story is guided mostly by Nikki and Kulwinder but neither of them are developed enough for the reader to care about them. I stopped wondering when the characters were going to become more interesting (because clearly it wasn’t going to happen) and I decided to focus mostly on the hard hitting themes and plot.

“We built Southall because we didn’t know how to be British… If you had any problems in this new country, your neighbors would rush to your side and bring you money, food, whatever you need. That’s the beauty of being surrounded by your community.” The younger women in the story view community as a prison. It can be supportive but it’s critical if you don’t comply to doing what is expected of you. It can even lead to death. However there are many different versions of this community which we compared to ourselves living here in France. As Anglophones, we adapt to French society as much as we can, while taking comfort in meeting amongst ourselves regularly. It’s our way of giving support and sharing our common culture, but we don’t pressure each other to behave or live in particular ways. The Southall community women, on the other hand, are repressed and made to believe that their lives are not successful without marriage and children. The repression isn’t just implemented by the men but also by the older women on the younger ones for the men; and that makes it all the more disturbing.

As a whole this book makes for a very good book club discussion, although it wasn’t all I expected. Lacking in character development, Erotic Stories For Punjabi Widows comes off as a movie script, with wooden dialogue. As I was reading, I could actually imagine how it would look on screen. There is a lot of telling and not much showing. It’s not literary fiction because it doesn’t give you more to mentally chew on other than what is literally written on the pages. I don’t think this book will stick with me very long. Even though, I’d recommend this book to people who like community/immigrant stories and stories about Indian communities living in England. But, if you’re looking for a book that’s going to make you think deeply this isn’t the one.

Balli Kaur Jaswal was born is Singapour. Inheritance, her first novel, was published in 2013. She won the Sydney Morning Herald’s Best Young Australian Novelist Award. She has also written Sugarbread (2016) and her new release of 2019 The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters, a novel about Punjabi sisters off on a pilgrimage to their homeland to lay their mother to rest.

Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows, (Harper Collins) paperback 295 pages

Rating: ⭐️⭐️💫

https://youtu.be/brL4FZCWt2k

American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin – Terrance Hayes

When I heard about the release of this American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin, I knew I had to read it.  I don’t often read poetry but when I do it’s because I’m sure the collection is going to move me.  And this one did that and more.

This collection was savvy, intelligent, angry, creative, and has its pages and words on the pulse of what’s wrong with America.  How does a poet cope with the election of a new president?  Lyrical and rhythmic, Hayes let’s us know what the deal is.  So you need to be ready.  He’s angry. Every sonnet in the collection has the same title, ‘American Sonnet for My Past and Future Assassin’.  One of the coolest things about this collection is that there is a sonnet index at the back.  The first line of each sonnet with its page number moreover when you read each line in the index it makes another poem.

In this collection, Hayes is the assassin but so are we if we feel as angry as he does.  He makes it clear that we are all linked and that we need to realize that and act like it.  He also reiterates that we’re in the shit! He uses everything from police brutality to pop culture to express his thoughts so if you aren’t up on the news, music, literature, tv, shows, movies, etc., it might be difficult to understand the meaning behind these sonnets.  I personally found them excellent and would recommend them to everyone, especially to Americans.  I’ve already read it twice.  Finding new meaning throughout the collection and I will surely pick it up again.  We are going through a difficult and unprecedented period in the United States that needs to change for the better!  All I can say is read American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin for some consolation and most of all vote!  Check out the video below where Terrance Hayes talks about his writing and reads a few of his poems.  He’s brilliant!

“AMERICAN SONNET FOR MY PAST AND FUTURE ASSASSIN

The umpteenth thump on the rump of a badunkadunk
Stumps us. The link, the chump, the hunk of plunder.
The umpteenth horny, honky stump speech pumps
A funky rumble over air. The umpteenth slump
In our humming democracy, a bumble bureaucracy
With teeny tiny wings too small for its rumpled,
Dumpling of a body. Humpty-Dumpy. Frumpy
Suit. The umpteenth honk of hollow thunder.
The umpteenth Believe me. The umpteenth grumpy,
Jumpy retort. Chump change, casino game, tuxedo,
Teeth bleach, stump speech. Junk science. Junk bond.
Junk country, sum speech. The umpteenth boast
Stumps our toe. The umpteenth falsehood stumps
Our elbows & eyeballs, our Nos, Whoahs, wows, woes.”

American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassins, p. 48 – Terrance Hayes  (Penguin Books) 89 pages, paperback

Rating: 5 stars

If you’d like to pick up a copy of American Sonnets For My Past And Future Assassins or any of my other recommendations please consider clicking my affiliate link for The Book Depository. It would be much appreciated. It will help fund my incessant book buying, reading, and reviewing. Thank you!
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No Place To Call Home – JJ Bola

JJ Bola’s, debut novel, No Place To Call Home attentively develops the themes expected in a novel about refugees surviving in a strange new country. Bola touches on language, community, parent-child relationships, specifically father-son and father-daughter relationships, expectations of first generation African children, religion, moeurs, and most of all home. All of these subjects are catalysts for developing each of the main characters.

The personable third person voice of No Place To Call Home tells the story of Papa, Mami, Jean, and Marie. The ingenuity of the narrator’s voice gently pulls us into the complex life of this family. Refugees from the Congo living in London, we follow the difficulty of Papa and Mami to survive while waiting to get their papers, which will allow them to stay in the UK legally. They are fleeing political horrors of the dictator Le Maréchal.

The story quickly focuses mostly on their family life. Jean is about 11 years old, trying to fit in and master the English language. This comes with many tests, from fitting in with the boys to making excellent grades to pleasing his exigent father. Jean’s sister Marie is the model child and student. She is younger and not the first-born boy so she doesn’t have the same expectations placed upon her as, her brother, Jean.

Bola does an excellent comparison of Papa and Jean by starting out developing Jean’s character at school in the UK and then later paralleling that with Papa’s adaptation to École Polytechinique in Brussels. They are two different ages in these scenes but it depicts similar difficulties they have, how they deal with them and how they develop and reinforce their personalities. This also depicts the way Bola has chosen to talk about African societal expectations for African men and women. The roles of men are incorporated in the story and juxtaposed with those of women. For example, there is Tonton, the lazy womanizer, Pastor Kaddi the dishonest evangelical priest, and Koko Patrice, Papa’s manipulative, elusive father, and Koko Mobali, Mami’s domineering father.

I strongly urge you to pick up No Place To Call Home.  Its touching characters and well-developed story lines will have you completely submerged.  I read this book in two sittings. I couldn’t put it down.  However the only thing that disappointed me about this book was the ending.  I was hoping for something a bit more concrete.

“JJ Bola is a Kinshasa-born, London-raised writer, poet, educator, and workshop facilitator. He has published two books of poetry, Elevate and Word, and performs regularly at shows and festivals.  In 2015-2016, Bola performed on a US poetry slam tour that took him to San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Dallas, Toronto, and more.  He lives in London.” (back cover of No Place To Call home)

No Place to Call Home, 286 pages, Arcade Publishing

Rating: 4 stars

Recommended to: Readers looking for interesting fiction novels about refugees in the UK

Book quote:  “If you are lucky, you will never have to remember home through your mother’s tears or the rage in your father’s voice when it shakes. Home will be somewhere you run to, never away from. It will never chase you away; a rabid dog hot on your heels with teeth like a shark, teeth so sharp you can already feel it cutting into you.” (No Place to Call Home, p. 285)

If you’d like to pick up a copy of No Place To Call Home or any of my other recommendations please consider clicking my affiliate link for The Book Depository. It would be much appreciated. It will help fund my incessant book buying, reading, and reviewing. Thank you!
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Sag Harbor Live Discussion

Sag Harbor – Colson Whitehead, 329 pages, Anchor Books

Rating: 4,5 stars

Recommended to: Lovers of coming-of-age stories, summer read…

Particularity: Coming-of-age story by a black man

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The Unkind Hours – Dwayne Alexander Smith

The Unkind Hours is the latest exciting thriller from Dwayne Alexander Smith, the author of terribly underrated Forty Acres. (You need to read Forty Acres if you haven’t already!)  We meet an ex-baseball player Steven who’s married to Nichole. They are happily married and have a little girl named Luna who is four years old.   She’s the apple of her father’s eye.  Steven and Nichole work together in their successful home decorating business.  It seems as if they have the ideal life, as if nothing can touch them, until something tragic happens that will alter their lives and make Steven do the unthinkable.  Smith explores the difficulty of doing the right thing by placing Steve in a moral predicament the reader is not likely to forget.  Is there real justice out there or should we take matters into our own hands.

Everything about this books screams excellent thriller for summer. Steven is the main character and is written in a fairly realistic manner. The story turns mostly around two characters so all the other characters are secondary.  However, that doesn’t make the story boring.  The strong dynamic between these two characters is what makes The Unkind Hours so suspenseful.  The pacing of the book is fast-moving enough with its short chapters and twists and turns.  The plot is interesting and Smith throws in enough surprises to keep the reader not only occupied with the story, but keeping us guessing on what’s to come.  Smith has even added a little surprise touch towards the end of the book that made me grin from ear-to-ear.  Can’t tell you what it is because that wouldn’t be fair to you. You’ll get it as soon as you read it.

Sadly this book ends on a bit of a cliffhanger because I was expecting the story to be tied up at the end.  This being said the villain in this novel is going to be an excellent character for Smith to play around with in future novels.  We’ll have to stay tuned to see when and if a part 2 comes out of The Unkind Hours.

The Unkind Hours, 340 pages, Damn Good Books

Rating: 4 stars

Recommended to: lovers of thrillers, readers who enjoyed Forty Acres, summer beach read!

If you’d like to pick up a copy of The Unkind Hours or any of my other recommendations please consider clicking my affiliate link for The Book Depository.  It would be much appreciated. It will help fund my incessant book buying, reading, and reviewing. Thank you!
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What Truth Sounds Like – Michael Eric Dyson

Michael Eric Dyson is back with his newly released book today, What Truth Sounds Like.  What Truth Sounds Like is  Dyson’s continued discussion of race in America, carried over from his book last year called Tears We Cannot Stop A Sermon to White America.  It was a book that was written specifically to speak to white America, whereas What Truth Sounds Like is written for us all.

Dyson begins the book focused on a discussion about race in 1963 between Robert Kennedy, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, and Lena Horne among others.  Kennedy was trying to find out their views on fighting segregation and discrimination in the north.  There weren’t any civil rights leaders there, just “well-known writers and other professional persons who have served as unofficial spokesmen for their race.”(What Truth Sounds Like, p. 14)

This historical meeting is the catalyst for Dyson to talk about race in America.  The opening chapter is an excellent beginning because it brings to light the difficulty of segregation and discrimination during one of the most critical moments in American history.  Baldwin and his friends were accusing Kennedy of not knowing anything about black life or the struggles of black people.  This is exactly the same reflection that could be made about white people today.

“Baldwin knew that America could only survive if it underwent an extraordinary social transformation-equality for all, hatred for none-that echoed the most noble ideals set out by our founding fathers.” (What Truth Sounds Like, p. 7)

As What Truth Sounds Like develops into chapters discussing the martyrs, the meeting, the politicians, the artists, the intellectuals, and the activists, Dyson goes through many of the different racial situations that have happened in the US in the past but specifically during this past 1 year and 136 days of Trumps presidency.  He also talks about specific famous people like Mohammed Ali and his activism as well a mistake he made referring to Frazier with “You seen the gorilla? From Manila?”.  He talks about President Obama – what he represented, his good points and the things that didn’t go so well.  He mentions so many people from Harry Belafonte to Chadwick Boseman, yes Black Panther and Wakanda. Yes, Wakanda Forever!

If Dyson does anything, he portrays the complexity of race in America and how the country has systematically refused to deal with the problem at all.   White people believed because President Obama was elected twice that there was no racism in America.  How naive is that thought?   One thing is for sure that Dyson says is that racism will have to be fought by both black and white people.  What Truth Sounds Like breaks down the good, the bad and the ugly and even tries to give solutions to some issues.   His style of writing is clear and detailed.  The masses of information he writes about is backed up with notes found in the back of the book.

I highly recommend both What Truth Sounds Like and Tears We Cannot Speak.  Moreover, if you prefer, get the audiobook which  is being read by Dyson, who has a powerful, rich voice that will have you captivated.  I urge you to watch the clip below of Michael Eric Dyson on The View, especially if you don’t know who he is.  He’s highly intelligent and doesn’t sugar coat.  He gives me life!

* I’d like to thank St. Martin’s Press for sending me this book in exchange for an honest review.

What Truth Sounds Like, 304 pages, St. Martin’s Press

Rating: 5 stars

Recommended to:  Readers interested in reading about race relations in the United States

 

 

Backlist Novels Series #1 Daughter by Asha Bandele

I was looking through my Instagram feed the other day and marveling over all of the new Bookstagram accounts popping up.  It’s great to see that people are getting the reading bug and that they want to share what they’re reading with others.  Openly sharing one’s reading journey is not always an easy thing to do.  It’s like trying to jump onto  a moving train in some cases. Yes I said it a moving train.  You’re probably wondering why I’ve decided to use that analogy.  We’re all trying to read the latest releases first so that we can gush like crazy over them before everyone else does.  We don’t want to feel left out of the reading arena of new books that are flooding the market everyday.   Well, while I was scrolling my feed and admiring all the lovely pics of the books; it struck me that the same books were being featured over and over.   Most of them are either literary prize shortlists and longlists, or the newest releases.  It’s easy to post about these types of books but I feel hearing about those backlist books is even more inspiring and important to our TBRs.

I’ve been wondering why backlist books haven’t been getting much love. So, here I am.  I’ll be coming to you the next few months with backlist novels that I think you should check out.  Not only are they backlist books, but they are also underrated in my opinion!  So I’ll be taking time over the next few months to shine a spotlight on some books that frankly, I can’t begin to understand why more people aren’t raving about them, particularly authors that are being read lately because of their new releases while their backlist novels remain untouched.

The first novel I’m going to start the series with is Daughter by Asha Bandele.  Daughter was originally published in 2003 by Scribner.  This was Bandele’s third novel and I hope to try to get to The Prisoner’s Wife, Something Like Beautiful:  One Single Mother’s Story, and of course the newly released When They Call You a Terrorist:  A Black Lives Matter Memoir, which she co-wrote with Patrisse Khan-Cullors and Angela Y. Davis.  Check out the video below where I review Daughter.  I hope this series will get you motivated to look for some brilliant backlist books on your shelves to read, re-read, and to showcase on your social media accounts.  And if you do decide to read and showcase any of these books please use #backlistbooks, so that maybe people will look at them a bit closer.  Happy reading!

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April Wrap Up 2018

April was a successful month of reading. Why, you ask?  Duh, I read a five-star book!  The last book I finished in April was read on the 28th and it really rocked my literary fiction world.  Slave Old Man by Patrick Chamoiseau is 152 pages of pure literary genius.  It’s a must read for all of you lovers of literary fiction.  Having only read excerpts of Texaco in French, another great book by Chamoiseau, I’m anxious to buddy read it this month with Claire from Word by Word and Leslie from Folklore & Literacy.  I’m excited to extend my journey through Caribbean literature with two awesome reading buddies.

Slave Old Man explores the escape of a slave.  He escapes as if it’s something he was always planning to do.  There was no inner struggle, no people in particular left behind, and no fear.  He just decides one day that that’s the day and he walks calmly right off the plantation and is gone for quite a bit before anyone notices.

Quickly, savage nature impresses him as it does to the master and the mastiff that are searching with much difficulty for the old slave man’s trail. I suggest you pick up this well written novel filled with beautiful descriptions. You won’t want to miss this novella which was newly released on May 1st by The New Press.  As for the other books I read, I’m going to start from the four-star books and work my way down to the two-stars ones.

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi was the book club pick for April.  It was a re-read for me.   Two years later and I still felt the same way about it.  It was a powerful generational story of slavery and how it affects families.  Each characters’ story was interesting however, I wish we could have learned more about the characters.  Gyasi is brilliant with writing male characters because they seemed to be more memorable than some of the female characters.  I’d say this book felt like reading a linked short story collection more than a real novel.  The characters have to share the pages since the voice changes every twenty or so pages.  I still found myself having to look back at the family tree to remember the names.  This being said it is well worth the read and sparked some passionate conversation at my book club.  We could all agree that we could see how she was trying to make the family history go round 360° to give it depth and more historical meaning.

The next four-star book I read was a poetry collection by Nicole Sealey called Ordinary Beast.  I don’t read poetry as much as I should but this collection was a real surprise.  Sealey’s poems are odes to life the real things we’re feeling and won’t necessarily want to say aloud.  Her poems are unapologetically real, from the words chosen to how they are printed on the page.  She’s telling us about race, gender, beauty, death and more.  It may not be the best collection for debuting poetry readers, being that it’s slightly experimental in its wording and structure, but for those who love poetry that touches you deeply and makes you think, Ordinary Beast is ideal.

I’ll be counting Ordinary Beast as part of my Caribbean literature challenge since Nicole Sealey was born in St. Thomas, although she was raised in Florida.  Just so you can get a taste of her poetry here’s one of my favorites:

unframed

Handle this body. Spoil

it with oils.  Let the

residue corrode, ruin it.

I have no finish, no

fragile edge.  (On what

scrap of me have we

not made desire paths,

so tried as to bury

ourselves therein?)  I

beg:  spare me gloved

hands, monuments to

nothing. I mean to die a

relief against every wall.

  Nicole Sealey, Ordinary Beast, p. 58

Black Betty is Walter Mosley’s fourth book in the Easy Rawlins series. I won’t be able to talk much about it because I don’t want to give anything away if you’re reading it too.  I rated it three stars because It wasn’t as good as Devil in a Blue Dress and White Butterfly but it was surely better than A Red Death.  Black Betty is great with setting the scene and story because it’s 1961 and Easy has some changes to his household.  Mouse and Mofass are back and of course there is a wide range of new characters.  There are a few new twists and turns to the novel but not enough happens to warrant it more stars unfortunately.  I’m still enjoying this series and can’t wait to pick up A Little Yellow Dog this month.

The next two books were both rated two stars.  Oh well everything you read can’t be wonderful.  Vernon Subutex by Virgine Despentes has been nominated on the shortlist of the Man Book International prize.  So, I decided to pick it up knowing already a bit about Despentes and what she likes to write about.  I also looked at it as a chance to try something new but also to read at least one of the books on the Man Booker International shortlist before the winner is announced.  I even read this one in French.  Now I’m curious to read a bit of the English version to see how the translator made out with all the French slang.  As for the story it wasn’t really for me.  The first 150 pages had me engaged with its critical, pessimistic view on society, the economy, and everything else having to do with adulting and living in the world.  Vernon Subutex is ignoble, lazy, and misogynous.  He used to own a record store called Revolver that went out of business.  So in the beginning of the book he is being evicted from his apartment.  He has to accept some generosity from past friends and eventually winds up having to live on the streets of Paris.  Since he was a good friend with a famous rock star called Alex Bleach and possesses a last recording from him, everyone is trying to get their hands on it.   Sounds intriguing right? However, past page 200 I checked out mentally and became bored with the  all of the off the wall characters and the incessant rants (Virginie Descents’ rants). Vernon Subtext could win the prize though.  It has all the right characteristics – being different from what’s expected, it critiques society heavily, and its divisiveness.  There are 3 other books in the Vernon Subutex series and that idea alone tires me out just thinking about it.

Lastly, I read Bad Men and Wicked Women by Eric Jerome Dickey to review for Dutton Books.  I’m always willing to try out  a new Eric Jerome Dickey novel because I have fond memories of reading his earlier works.  I didn’t love this one.  I feel like he’s abandoned the good story writing he used to do in exchange for trying to impress millennials to read his books these days.  Bad Men and Wicked Women contains a ton of bad Men  and only one true “wicked” woman.  So the title needs to be reviewed.

Ken Swift is the main character  and he is a strong-arm for a big gangster called San Bernadino.  Swift makes his money roughing up customers to get them to pay up.  At the beginning of the novel,  Swift has a meeting with his daughter who he hasn’t seen since she was a child.  This storyline is supposed to depict the more sensitive side and family life that he had in the past.  Then Swift and his partner are sent off to rough up somebody that owes money to San Bernadino and from that incident the story begins.  Problems? Yes.   Nothing really happens during the first three-quarters of the book.  The dialogue doesn’t come off naturally and all of the action takes place within the last quarter of the novel.   The action can best be described as Tarantinoesque.   I wouldn’t recommend it unless you’re a die hard fan of Eric Jerome Dickey and don’t mind the lack of plot.

So, as a whole reading in April turned out to be unexceptional, except for Slave Old Man.  My month’s reading was an overall average rating of three stars.  I read 6 books which at least keeps me on track for my goal of reading 60 books by the end of the year. In fact, I’m ahead of schedule by five books.  Unfortunately, I’ve only read 1,690 pages this month.  I was hoping to read over 2,000 pages.  I’m going to have to step up on reading bigger books because I’m already behind on the Big Book Challenge by 2 books.   I pledged to read 12 books over 400+ pages this year and I’ve actually only read two.  But, I’m going to end this on a positive note. I’m keeping up with my reviewing and that’s great and I’m basically reading what I want to while not being too influenced by what others are reading.  So, how did reading go for you in the month of April?  Are you hitting your reading goals?

 

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